Member Monday October 2016


Conway Twitty aka Harold Jenkins from his high school yearbook.​

​Conway’s first success came as a rock & roll singer with his 1958 #1 hit “It’s Only Make Believe.”

​Conway Twitty has been featured in several episodes of the animated sitcom Family Guy. The show’s creator Seth MacFarlane is a huge Conway Twitty fan, and his inclusion in the show has introduced new generations to this Country Music Hall of Fame member.

In 1971, Conway Twitty teamed up with Loretta Lynn Official and became one of the most successful duets in country music. They released one album and single each year from 1971 – 1981 with five of those singles topping the Billboard chart. ​

"Hello Darlin'

Conway Twitty released this self-penned composition in 1970 that would become his signature song.

 


 

Conway Twitty Snapchat Story


 

READ MORE ABOUT
CONWAY TWITTY
HERE.


DeFord Bailey was one of the earliest performers on the WSM Barn Dance, later renamed the Grand Ole Opry. Bailey performed on the show from 1925 to 1941. In the 1960s, 70s, and 80s Bailey returned to make guest appearances on the show.​

This 78 was recorded by DeFord in 1927. The title comes from a passenger train, which was said to have limited stops. ​

DeFord Bailey was featured on the cover and inside this edition of the Journal of Country Music from 1992 produced by the staff of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. ​

Here's the cover of this critically acclaimed box set from 1998 that was produced by the staff of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. DeFord Bailey was country music's first African American star.​

 

“Pan American Blues”

Watch a short clip of DeFord Bailey playing “Pan American Blues” on the National Life Grand Ole Opry from 1965

 

 

DeFord Bailey Snapchat Story


 

READ MORE ABOUT
DEFORD BAILEY
HERE.


 

These two ads are only a year apart. One from 1955 where the Louvin Brothers are listed as the headliner with Elvis Presley as the guest. The other from 1956 listing Elvis as the headliner with the Louvins and other Grand Ole Opry stars as guests.

Check out this scary and iconic Louvin Brother's album cover, for the 1959 album Satan is Real. The album itself would influence many artists who came after including Gram Parsons, The Byrds, and Emmylou Harris. 

Charlie Louvin used this Sho-Bud guitar, with mother-of-pearl binding and his name on the headstock, following the break-up of the Louvin Brothers in 1963. 

This is a re-strike of an original 1959 Hatch Show Print poster advertising a Louvin Brothers concert.

 

“I Don’t Believe You’ve Met My Baby”

The Louvin Brothers rarely appeared on TV, but here they are singing their hit “I Don’t Believe You’ve Met My Baby.” on the Purina Grand Ole Opry Show, IN 1956.

 


 

Louvin Brothers Snapchat Story


 

READ MORE ABOUT
THE LOUVIN BROTHERS
HERE.

 

 

Did you know that Vince once opened for KISS in Oklahoma City? Hear Vince talk about that night and cutting his teeth on the road in this 1985 interview.

 

 

"One More Last Chance"

In addition to hosting he was CMA’s Entertainer of the Year in 1993 and 1994 and Male Vocalist of the Year from 1991 to 1995. No other artist has won the Male Vocalist award in five consecutive years.

 

 

"Liza Jane"

Vince Gill's 1991 album, Pocket Full of Gold, was a platinum smash, giving him four Top Ten singles Including the title track plus “Look at Us,” “Take Your Memory with You,” and “Liza Jane.”


 

READ MORE ABOUT
VINCE GILL
HERE.

 

 

Vince Gill Snapchat Story


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